Sweathogs tear up Ft. Stewart

By Cpl. Brendan Roethel | August 08, 2014

Sweathogs tear up Ft. Stewart
The Marines with Marine Wing Support Squadron 273 departed July 30, and made their way to Fort Stewart in Hinesville, Ga., for Field Exercise 2-14. Field Exercise 2-14 is a 10 to 12 day field exercise the squadron conducts in order to get Marines and sailors tactically ready with weapon familiarization, performing land navigation, living in the field and gives them a chance to execute their Military Occupational Specialties in the field, according to Master Sgt. Daniel Rodriguez, the motor transport chief for MWSS-273.
Sweathogs tear up Ft. Stewart
The Marines with Marine Wing Support Squadron 273 departed July 30, and made their way to Fort Stewart in Hinesville, Ga., for Field Exercise 2-14. Field Exercise 2-14 is a 10 to 12 day field exercise the squadron conducts in order to get Marines and sailors tactically ready with weapon familiarization, performing land navigation, living in the field and gives them a chance to execute their Military Occupational Specialties in the field, according to Master Sgt. Daniel Rodriguez, the motor transport chief for MWSS-273.
Sweathogs tear up Ft. Stewart
The Marines with Marine Wing Support Squadron 273 departed July 30, and made their way to Fort Stewart in Hinesville, Ga., for Field Exercise 2-14. Field Exercise 2-14 is a 10 to 12 day field exercise the squadron conducts in order to get Marines and sailors tactically ready with weapon familiarization, performing land navigation, living in the field and gives them a chance to execute their Military Occupational Specialties in the field, according to Master Sgt. Daniel Rodriguez, the motor transport chief for MWSS-273.
The Marines with Marine Wing Support Squadron 273 departed July 30, and made their way to Fort Stewart in Hinesville, Ga., for Field Exercise 2-14.
Field Exercise 2-14 is a 10 to 12 day field exercise the squadron conducts in order to get Marines and sailors tactically ready with weapon familiarization, performing land navigation, living in the field and gives them a chance to execute their Military Occupational Specialties in the field, according to Master Sgt. Daniel Rodriguez, the motor transport chief for MWSS-273.
While the squadron is at FEX 2-14, it will carry out various convoys, working and sleeping in field tents and be employing field mechanisms used to help the squadron be self-sufficient in the field.
According to Rodriguez, the exercise is a way for each company and section to come together and see each other’s job proficiency within the squadron.
For some of the Marines and sailors involved this is their first time in the field or in a training environment like this.
“I expect them to learn the basic fundamentals of a convoy and patrolling, refueling on the go and getting more hands-on with their jobs rather than their usual day-to-day assignments,” Rodriguez said.
Not all of the Marines and sailors are new to this environment. For many, this will be a chance to pass on their knowledge and expertise to other service members who have never stepped foot in this type of environment.
“I have participated in many different training exercises throughout my career,” Rodriguez said. “I expect the newer and junior Marines to sharpen their proficiency skills in their MOS and take a lot of the training they are receiving during this exercise and apply it to their future endeavors.”
Marine Wing Support Squadron 273 is slated to return to the Air Station, Aug. 9. The squadron will return with new knowledge and better understandings on the importance of each section and unit’s job for future deployments and exercises.

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