MARINE CORPS PHOTOS

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Marines discuss combat leadership April 23 at the Chapel Center on Camp Foster. The discussion was part of a Lance Corporal Seminar, which took place April 21-24. The seminar teaches junior-ranking Marines the skills and leadership needed to be the future leaders in the Marine Corps. Participants learned about technical writing, using proficiency and conduct marks in evaluations, leading physical training and drill, public speaking, instructing classes, and other attributes expected of strong leaders. The students honed these skills via practical application and group discussions throughout the week. The Marines are with Combat Logistics Regiment 3 and 3rd Medical Battalion, 3rd Marine Logistics Group, III Marine Expeditionary Force.
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Gunnery Sgt. Lester A. Tucker, left, instructs a class on ethical decision making April 23 at the Chapel Center on Camp Foster. The class was part of a Lance Corporal Seminar that took place April 21-24. The seminar teaches junior-ranking Marines the skills needed to be future leaders in the Marine Corps. Participants learned about technical writing, using proficiency and conduct marks in evaluations, leading physical training and drill, public speaking, instructing classes, and other attributes expected of strong leaders. The students honed these skills via practical application and group discussions throughout the week. The Marines are with Combat Logistics Regiment 3 and 3rd Medical Battalion, 3rd Marine Logistics Group, III Marine Expeditionary Force. Tucker is the equal opportunity advisor with 3rd MLG, III MEF.
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Marines memorize items contained in a box as part of a “Kim’s game” during an endurance course April 17 at the Jungle Warfare Training Center on Camp Gonsalves. The Marines look at the items early in the course and then have to tell the instructors what items were in the box just before the last leg of the event. The simple game tests the participant’s mental capacity while enduring stressful and fatiguing activity. The Marines are with various units assigned to Combat Assault Battalion, 3rd Marine Division, III Marine Expeditionary Force. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Stephen D. Himes/Released)
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Recruits of Company K, 3rd Recruit Training Battalion, swim 25-meters during the Water Survival Basic Qualification during week four of training aboard the depot, March 31. While recruits paddled and treaded water, swimming instructors kept a close eye on them to assure they applied the right techniques and to be there as a saftey precaution.
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Company K recruits listen to Micheal R. Harrison, drill instructor, Instructional Training Company, Support Battalion, as he teaches them the third general order during the Interior Guard class aboard the depot, April 3.
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Staff Sgt. Marlon A. Cajina, drill instructor, Instructional Training Company, gives a brief to educators before beginning the Combat Fitness Test during Educators’ Workshop aboard the depot, April 8. Drill instructors performed a demonstration of each event to ensure the educators understood the course and the proper technique for each event.
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MARINE CORPS RECRUIT DEPOT PARRIS ISLAND, S.C. – From left to right; Pfc. Zachary K. Moneymaker, honor graduate of platoon 3024; Pfc. Cody B. Patrick, honor graduate of platoon 3025; and Pfc. Jordan T. Cassadine, honor graduate of platoon 2036, all prepare to retire their guidons to the drill instructors during graduation here, on April 25, 2014. Moneymaker, Patrick, and Cassadine were all recruited from the 6th Marine Corps District. Recruit training signifies the transformation of a civilian to a United States Marine. Upon graduation the newly-minted Marines will receive ten days of leave before attending the School of Infantry East, Camp Gieger, N.C. The Marines will be trained in basic infantry skills and ensure that the Marines are combat ready. (Official Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. John-Paul Imbody)
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Sgt. Richard N. West, a drill instructor from Marine Corps Recruit Depot Parris Island, S.C., and Capt. Stanley C. Wisniewski, Marine Corps Recruit Depot Parris Island, S.C., shooting team officer in charge, Eastern Division Team, fire the National Match M1911 .45 caliber service pistol one-handed, during the team pistol match portion of the 2014 Marine Corps Match Championships, April 16, aboard the Weapons Training Battalion ranges at Stone Bay. Eighty-four competitors competed in the championships in three different categories. The individual rifle match, the individual pistol match and the team rifle and pistol match. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Alicia R. Leaders)
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Sgt. Richard N. West, a drill instructor from Marine Corps Recruit Depot Parris Island, S.C., receives a medal from Col. James W. Clark, deputy commander of Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune and guest speaker, during the 2014 Marine Corps Match Championships Award Ceremony aboard the Weapons Training Battalion gymnasium at Stone Bay, April 18. Eighty-four competitors competed in the championships in three different categories. The individual rifle match, the individual pistol match and the team rifle and pistol match. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Alicia R. Leaders)
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Sgt. Richard N. West, a drill instructor from Marine Corps Recruit Depot Parris Island, S.C., Eastern Division Team, fires the National Match M1911 .45 caliber service pistol one-handed, with his other hand placed in the pocket for stability, during the individual pistol portion of the 2014 Marine Corps Match Championships from April 14-16 aboard the Weapons Training Battalion ranges at Stone Bay. The individual pistol match is shot at the 25-yard line and 50-yard line, and must be shot one-handed, and the other hand can be placed in the pocket for stability. West is one of 84 competitors, and they competed in three different categories. The individual rifle match, the individual pistol match and the team rifle and pistol match. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Alicia R. Leaders/Released)
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Sgt. Richard N. West, a drill instructor from Marine Corps Recruit Depot Parris Island, S.C., Eastern Division Team, loads a magazine in preparation for firing the National Match M1911 .45 caliber service pistol during the individual pistol portion of the 2014 Marine Corps Match Championships from April 14-16 aboard the Weapons Training Battalion ranges at Stone Bay. The individual pistol match is shot at the 25-yard line and 50-yard line, and must be shot one-handed. West is one of 84 competitors, and they competed in three different categories. The individual rifle match, the individual pistol match and the team rifle and pistol match. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Alicia R. Leaders/Released)
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Sgt. Richard N. West, a drill instructor from Marine Corps Recruit Depot Parris Island, S.C., Eastern Division Team, fires the National Match M16A4 service rifle with iron sights at the 200-yard line during the individual rifle portion of the 2014 Marine Corps Championships from April 14-16 aboard the Weapons Training Battalion ranges at Stone Bay. West is one of 84 competitors, and they competed in three different categories. The individual rifle match, the individual pistol match and the team rifle and pistol match. The individual rifle match and team match are shot from the 200-yard line, 300-yard line and 600-yard line. The match rifle weighs approximately 17 pounds, with a stainless steel barrel with both weighted hand guards and butt stock. During competition marksmanship, competitors are supplied with unique shooting jackets and non-slip leather rifle slings that provide additional stability, and long-distance scouting scopes to sight shots at distances more than 600 yards. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Alicia R. Leaders/Released)
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Staff Sgt. Theodoor A. Steber, a drill instructor, marches educators during the Educators' Workshop at Marine Corps Recruit Dept San Diego April 8, 2014. The educators were instructed on the proper response to common terms during recruit training, such as "eyeballs" and "ears."
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Staff Sgt. Brian Sixto, a drill instructor for Platoon 3034, encourages Rct. Edgar Barua-Gomez, Platoon 3034, Mike Company, 3rd Recruit Training Battalion, to respond to orders March 12, 2014, during an incentive training session on Parris Island, S.C. Discipline, defined as the instant and willing obedience to all orders, respect for authority and self-reliance, is a key trait drill instructors like Sixto, 28, from Hobson, Texas, must instill in recruits. Barua-Gomez, 23, from Kensington, Md., is scheduled to graduate May 23, 2014. Parris Island has been the site of Marine Corps recruit training since Nov. 1, 1915. Today, approximately 20,000 recruits come to Parris Island annually for the chance to become United States Marines by enduring 13 weeks of rigorous, transformative training. Parris Island is home to entry-level enlisted training for 50 percent of males and 100 percent of females in the Marine Corps. (Photo by Cpl. Caitlin Brink)
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Recruiter instructors from across the Southeast attend the 6th Marine Corps District Recruiter Instructor Training Symposium held here April 1-4, 2014. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Courtney White/released)
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JROTC cadets compete during the 2014 Superintendent's Cup at Bluffton High School, in Bluffton, S.C., April 11. The event hosted five county high school JROTC units to compete in academia, a physical fitness test, an obstacle course, platoon drill, and color guard.
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