MARINE CORPS PHOTOS

Keyword: Category: Tag: Sort By:
Marines and Sailors practice clearing rooms and detaining non-combatants as a part of the Raid Leaders Course at Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton, Calif., Jan. 12, 2016. While the course emphasizes combat marksmanship fundamentals, Marines must be able to identify and properly handle non-combatants in urban military operations. The Marines participating in the training course are with Fox Company, 2nd Battalion, 4th Marine Corps Regiment. The Raid Leaders Course is run by Expeditionary Operations Training Group, I Marine Headquarters Group, I Marine Expeditionary Force.
Download Full Image Photo Details
Marines and Sailors practice clearing rooms as a part of the Raid Leaders Course at Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton, Calif., Jan. 12, 2016. With the myriad variables involved in urban combat, Marines must be able to enter and clear rooms and buildings while quickly and properly identifying threats, all the while keeping themselves and their team as safe as possible. The Marines participating in the training course are with Fox Company, 2nd Battalion, 4th Marine Corps Regiment. The Raid Leaders Course is run by Expeditionary Operations Training Group, I Marine Headquarters Group, I Marine Expeditionary Force.
Download Full Image Photo Details
Marines and Sailors practice clearing rooms as a part of the Raid Leaders Course at Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton, Calif., Jan. 12, 2016. The three-week course is designed to teach Marines all of the skills and tactics necessary to successfully conduct raids in urban operations. The Marines participating in the training course are with Fox Company, 2nd Battalion, 4th Marine Corps Regiment. The Raid Leaders Course is run by Expeditionary Operations Training Group, I Marine Headquarters Group, I Marine Expeditionary Force.
Download Full Image Photo Details
Lance Cpl. Sawyer Day, a combat engineer with Alpha Company, 2nd Combat Engineer Battalion, reloads his weapon during a Combat Marksmanship Program qualification. Marines conduct these qualifications yearly in order to remain combat ready in case they are called upon at a moment's notice.
Download Full Image Photo Details
Lance Cpl. Sawyer Day, a combat engineer with Alpha Company, 2nd Combat Engineer Battalion, fires at a target during a Combat Marksmanship Program qualification. Completed annually, this training helps Marines hone in on their skills as riflemen. The CMP shoot consists of a series of drills which make the Marine simulate close-range, fire and maneuver combat operations.
Download Full Image Photo Details
Marines with 2nd Combat Engineer Battalion engage targets during a Combat Marksmanship Program qualification event at Camp Lejeune, N.C., Jan. 13. The CMP shoot is a yearly requirement which allows Marines to sharpen up their skills are combat marksmen. The shoot consists of a series of close range drills to enhance speed and accuracy.
Download Full Image Photo Details
Cpl. Albert Willis, a combat engineer with Headquarters Company, 2nd Combat Engineer Battalion, fires at a target during a Combat Marksmanship Program qualification. Completed annually, this training helps Marines hone in on their skills as riflemen. The CMP shoot allows Marines to gain operate in simulated close-combat engagements which increase speed and accuracy.
Download Full Image Photo Details
A member of the Japan Ground Self-Defense Force demonstrates the use of a targeting optical aide during a tour of Japan Ground Self-Defense Force facilities Jan. 13 at Camp Komakado, Shizuoka, Japan. The visit strengthened the relationship between Marines and their JGSDF counterpart, 1st Anti-Aircraft Battalion, by allowing them to observe training procedures, weapon systems, tactical vehicles and equipment. The Marines are from 2nd Low Altitude Air Defense Battalion, Marine Aircraft Control Group 28; currently assigned to the 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, III Marine Expeditionary Force under the unit deployment program.
Download Full Image Photo Details
Marines pose for a picture with members of the Japan Ground Self-Defense Force during a tour of JGSDF facilities Jan. 13 at Camp Komakado, Shizuoka, Japan. The visit strengthened the relationship between Marines and members of the JGSDF by allowing the service members to discuss training and tactical procedures and observe each other’s tactical equipment and resources. The Marines visited the JGSDF motor pool, Improved Moving Target Simulator and 1st Anti-Aircraft Battalion building. The Marines are from 2nd Low Altitude Air Defense Battalion, Marine Aircraft Control Group 28; currently assigned to the 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, III Marine Expeditionary Force under the unit deployment program.
Download Full Image Photo Details
Marine 1st Lt. Yosef E. Adiputra presents a gift to Japan Ground Self-Defense Force 1st Lt. Takahashi during a tour of JGSDF facilities Jan. 13 at Camp Komakado, Shizuoka, Japan. The visit strengthened the relationship between Marines and JGSDF members by allowing the service members to observe each other’s training methods and operations. The Marines from 2nd Low Altitude Air Defense Battalion, Marine Aircraft Control Group 28; currently assigned to the 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, III Marine Expeditionary Force under the unit deployment program, visited their JGSDF counterpart, 1st Anti-Aircraft Battalion, observed weapon systems, tactical vehicles and martial arts demonstrations.
Download Full Image Photo Details
A Marine operates a simulated Personal Surface to Air Missile during a tour of Japan Ground Self-Defense Force facilities Jan. 13 at Camp Komakado, Shizuoka, Japan. The visit strengthened the relationship between Marines and members of the JGSDF through guided tours and discussions of tactics and equipment. The Marines, who are from 2nd Low Altitude Air Defense Battalion, Marine Aircraft Control Group 28; currently assigned to the 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, III Marine Expeditionary Force under the unit deployment program, visited their JGSDF counterpart, 1st Anti-Aircraft Battalion, to observe training procedures, weapon systems, tactical vehicles and equipment.
Download Full Image Photo Details
Lance Cpl. Hunter Rooks, a Marine with Combat Logistics Battalion 22, deflects baton attacks from an assailant after being sprayed with oleoresin capsicum, more commonly known as OC spray, at Camp Lejeune, N.C., Jan. 14. “The purpose of this course is to gain compliance without using lethal force,” said Cpl. Hayden Jolly, an artillery section chief with the unit.
Download Full Image Photo Details
Lance Cpl. Hunter Rooks, left, and Lance Cpl. Joshua Sutton, both Marines with Combat Logistics Battalion 22, perform a two-man takedown against an armed aggressor after being sprayed in the eyes with oleoresin capsicum, more commonly known as OC spray, at Camp Lejeune, N.C., Jan. 14. The take-down was part of an obstacle course, which also entailed the use of other baton techniques, blocking attacks from an assailant and a two-man takedown against an armed aggressor.
Download Full Image Photo Details
A Marine with Combat Logistics Battalion 22 attacks a stationary punching bag with a baton after being sprayed in the eyes with oleoresin capsicum, more commonly known as OC spray, at Camp Lejeune, N.C., Jan. 14. CLB-22 Marines have been enrolled in the course for a week and have started studying the effects and purposes of OC spray. Marines often use OC spray when mechanical control holds or other takedown techniques are no longer safe to execute.
Download Full Image Photo Details
A Marine with Combat Logistics Battalion 22 conducts joint manipulation techniques known as mechanical advantage control holds to gain compliance of an aggressor Camp Lejeune, N.C., Jan. 14. The non-lethal weapons training course is a two-week course that challenges each Marine to perform under a high intensity situation. The course teaches Marines everything from joint manipulation to riot control.
Download Full Image Photo Details
Lance Cpl. Hunter Rooks, a Marine with Combat Logistics Battalion 22, swings at a stationary target after being sprayed in the eyes with oleoresin capsicum, more commonly known as OC spray, at Camp Lejeune, N.C., Jan. 14. “I feel this was an effective means of instruction because if you or any of your Marines accidentally come in contact with the spray you’re going to know what to expect,” said Jolly.
Download Full Image Photo Details