MARINE CORPS PHOTOS

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U.S. Marine Corps Sgt. Christopher Corpus, an explosive ordnance disposal technician with Combat Logistics Detachment 1, Marine Rotational Force- Darwin, inspects his gear before departing with a convoy to Mount Bundey Training Area, Northern Territory, Australia, May 20, 2015. Marines with MRF-D wrap up final details in order to set out for Exercise Predator Walk. Predator Walk plays a role in MRF-D that exercises a competent expeditionary fighting force with Australian allies. Corpus is a native of Reno, Nevada.
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An MV-22B Osprey takes off from the Tribhuvan International Airport in Kathmandu, Nepal, as Operation Sahayogi Haat draws to a close May 21. The Osprey is bringing U.S. Marines back to Okinawa, Japan. The U.S. military came together as Joint Task Force 505 in response to a 7.8 magnitude earthquake April 25.
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U.S. Marines with the 15th Marine Expeditionary Unit load onto an MV-22B Osprey aboard the USS Essex off the coast of Hawaii, May 19, 2015. These Marines demonstrated the capabilities of an amphibious raid during the U.S. Pacific Command Amphibious Leadership Symposium. PALS is designed to bring together senior leaders from allied and partner Marine Corps, naval infantries and militaries around the Pacific with interest in military amphibious capability development.
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A U.S. Navy service member stands on the beach as a Landing Craft Air Cushion prepares to breach the shore during the MARFORPAC-hosted U.S. Pacific Command Amphibious Leaders Symposium (PALS) at Marine Corps Training Area Bellows May 19, 2015. The objective of PALS is to have meaningful dialogue on key aspects of maritime and amphibious operations, capability development, and interoperability. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Matthew J. Bragg)
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Marines with the 15th Marine Expeditionary Unit drive their amphibious assault vehicles along the beach during the MARFORPAC-hosted U.S. Pacific Command Amphibious Leaders Symposium (PALS) at Marine Corps Training Area Bellows, Hawaii, May 19, 2015. PALS is designed to bring together senior leaders of allied and partner Marine Corps, naval infantries, and militaries spanning the Indo-Asia-Pacific region with interest in military amphibious capability development. This year, 22 nations sent representatives to observe the training. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Matthew J. Bragg)
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U.S. Marines, assigned to the 15th Marine Expeditionary Unit, patrol through a Military Operation in Urban Terrain environment equipped with an Infantry Immersion Training simulation package during the MARFORPAC-hosted U.S. Pacific Command Amphibious Leaders Symposium aboard Marine Corps Training Area Bellows May 19, 2015. PALS is designed to bring together senior leaders of allied and partner Marine Corps, naval infantries, and militaries spanning the Indo-Asia-Pacific region. This year 22 nations sent representatives to observe this training and participated in meaningful dialogues on key aspects of maritime and amphibious operations, capability development and interoperability.
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U.S. Marine Lance Cpl. Jaime Torrez provides maintenance on a CH-53E Super Stallion aboard USS Essex at sea in the Pacific Ocean, May 17, 2015. Torrez is an airframe mechanic with Marine Medium Tiltrotor Squadron 161 (Reinforced), 15th Marine Expeditionary Unit. The aviation combat element of the 15th MEU maintains a state of combat readiness through constant upkeep on aircraft while on deployment.
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U.S. Marine Lance Cpl. Selim Griggsross provides maintenance on a CH-53E Super Stallion aboard USS Essex (LHD 2) at sea in the Pacific Ocean, May 17, 2015. Torres is an airframe mechanic with Marine Medium Tiltrotor Squadron 161 (Reinforced), 15th Marine Expeditionary Unit. The aviation combat element of the 15th MEU maintains a state of combat readiness through constant upkeep on aircraft while on deployment. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Staff Sgt. Miguel Carrasco/Released)
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Retired U.S. Marine Staff Sgt. Robert A. Henderson, 95, a Pearl Harbor survivor, tells Clemson University student Will Hines his story for an undergraduate research project called the Veterans Project, Feb. 21, 2015. Hines interviews veterans for the project, and then sends the tapes to the Library of Congress to be preserved forever. "The first plane flew so close to me I could have thrown a rock and hit it," said Henderson. He went on to serve 51 months in combat during WWII, culminating at the Battle of Okinawa. "I was in the first and last battles of the war." (U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Ken Scar)
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Former U.S. Marine Staff Sgt. Robert A. Henderson, 95, a Pearl Harbor survivor, tells Clemson University student Will Hines his story for the Veterans Project, an unergraduate research project, Feb. 21, 2015. The project was started to assist the Library of Congress collect, preserve and make accessible the personal accounts of American war veterans. "The first plane flew so close to me I could have thrown a rock and hit it," said Henderson. He would go on to serve 51 months in combat during WWII, culminated with the Battle of Okinawa. "I was in the first and last battles of the war," he said. (U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Ken Scar)
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Retired U.S. Marine Staff Sgt. Robert A. Henderson, 95, a Pearl Harbor survivor, poses next to his medals and a photo of himself from the era, Feb. 21, 2015. "Living this long is no accident," he explained. "It takes work." Henderson served 51 months in combat during WWII, culminating at the Battle of Okinawa. "I was in the first and last battles of the war." (Photo by Ken Scar)
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Clemson University junior Will Hines chats with retired U.S. Marine Staff Sgt. Robert A. Henderson, 95, a Pearl Harbor survivor, Feb. 210, 2015. Hines was interviewing Henderson for an undergraduate research project at Clemson in which he tapes interviews with veterans and sends copies to the Library of Congress to be preserved forever. Henderson spoke about watching from a hillside as Japanese planes started dropping torpedoes on U.S. targets. "The first plane flew so close to me I could have thrown a rock and hit it," he said. Henderson served 51 months in combat during WWII, including at the Battle of Okinawa. "I was in the first and last battles of the war." (U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Ken Scar).
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Marines with Company A, 1st Battalion, 4th Marine Regiment, Marine Rotational Force – Darwin, buddy rush during a mock squad attack as part of a live-fire training event May 14 to16 at Kangaroo Flats Training Area, Victoria, Northern Territory, Australia. The Marines and soldiers with 5th Battalion Royal Australian Regiment, Australian Army, Australian Defence Force, brushed up on squad attack tactics, basic point man skills and explosives to refine basic infantry skills. Company A is a part of the Marine Air Ground Task Force that is composed of an air, ground, logistics and command element creating the MRF-D. The rotational deployment in Darwin enables Marines to more effectively train, exercise and operate with their partners, enhancing regional security and building a capacity to respond more rapidly to natural disasters and crises throughout that region.
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Lance Corporal Brandon Renteria fires simulation rounds from a M32A1 multi-shot grenade launcher during a live-fire training event alongside Australian soldiers with 5th Battalion Royal Australian Regiment, Australian Army, Australian Defence Force, May 15 at Kangaroo Flats Training Area, Victoria, Northern Territory, Australia. The Marines with Company A, 1st Battalion, 4th Marine Regiment, Marine Rotational Force – Darwin, and Australian soldiers brushed up on squad attack tactics, basic point man skills and explosives to refine basic infantry skills. The rotational deployment of U.S. Marines affords an unprecedented combined training opportunity with their Australian allies and improves interoperability between the two forces. Renteria is a rifleman with Company A, 1st Battalion, 4th Marines, MRF-D.
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Marines with Company A, 1st Battalion, 4th Marine Regiment, Marine Rotational Force – Darwin, patrol through vegetation during a mock squad attack as part of a live-fire training event May 14 to 16 at Kangaroo Flats Training Area, Victoria, Northern Territory, Australia. The Marines and Australian soldiers with 5th Battalion Royal Australian Regiment, Australian Army, Australian Defence Force, brushed up on squad attack tactics, basic point man skills and explosives to refine basic infantry skills. Company A is a part of the Marine Air Ground Task Force that is composed of an air, ground, logistics and command element creating the MRF-D. The rotational deployment in Darwin enables Marines to more effectively train, exercise and operate with their partners, enhancing regional security and building a capacity to respond more rapidly to natural disasters and crises throughout that region.
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Marines with Bridge Company, 8th Engineering Support Battalion, disassemble a 16-bay, double-story bridge during a bridge masters course at Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune, North Carolina, May 15, 2015.  The unit employs bridges capable of holding M1A1 Abrams tanks, and provides a key element in supporting operations in different terrain.
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