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MARINE CORPS PHOTOS

Marines with Combat Logistics Battalion 453, Combat Logistics Regiment 4, 4th Marine Logistics Group, MARFORRES, take down the forward battalion aid station during Integrated Training Exercise 4-17 in Twentynine Palms, California on June 23, 2017. The Marines disassembled and relocated the BAS to maintain close proximity with and provide rapid response to potential casualties of 2nd Battalion, 25th Marine Regiment, 4th Marine Division, MARFORRES, during the final battalion exercise of ITX 4-17.
Marines assigned to Special Purpose Marine Air-Ground Task Force-Crisis Response-Africa prepare to load a MV-22B Osprey aircraft at Sierra Del Retan, Spain, June 26, 2017. SPMAGTF-CR-AF deployed to conduct limited crisis response and theater security operations in Europe and North Africa.
The Prisoner of War/Missing in Action table represents the service members who never had a chance to make it home or could not be found at the opening program of the Moving Vietnam Veterans Memorial Wall at Mission Springs Park in Desert Hot Springs, Calif., June 22, 2017. The Moving Wall, a scale model of the original Vietnam Veterans Memorial Wall, has the names of those men and women who were killed or missing in action etched onto a reflective stone, so visitors can not only see the names, but see themselves, reflecting on the lives of the people who fought and died to keep them safe. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Dave Flores)
Marines with the Headquarters Battalion Color Guard prepare to present the colors during the opening program of the Moving Vietnam Veteran Memorial Wall at Mission Springs Park in Desert Hot Springs, Calif., June 22, 2017. The Moving Wall, a scale model of the original Vietnam Veterans Memorial Wall, has the names of those men and women who were killed or missing in action etched onto a reflective stone, so visitors can not only see the names, but see themselves, reflecting on the lives of the people who fought and died to keep them safe. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Dave Flores)
Retired Air Force Staff Sgt. Dennis Blessman speaks to visitors about the Moving Vietnam Veteran Memorial Wall after the opening program at Mission Springs Park in Desert Hot Springs, Calif., June 22, 2017 The Moving Wall, a scale model of the original Vietnam Veterans Memorial Wall, has the names of those men and women who were killed or missing in action etched onto a reflective stone, so visitors can not only see the names, but see themselves, reflecting on the lives of the people who fought and died to keep them safe. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Dave Flores)
The city of Desert Hot Springs hosted the Moving Vietnam Veterans Memorial Wall at Mission Springs Park in Desert Hot Springs, Calif., June 22 through June 26, 2017. The Moving Wall, a scale model of the original Vietnam Veterans Memorial Wall, has the names of those men and women who were killed or missing in action etched onto a reflective stone, so visitors can not only see the names, but see themselves, reflecting on the lives of the people who fought and died to keep them safe. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Dave Flores)
Seaman Tyler Kelly provides medical care to a dummy during a Tactical Evacuation Course at Camp Lejeune, N.C., June 27, 2017. The course consisted of corpsmen identifying dummy casualties and assessing them for injuries ranging from gunshot wounds, amputations to severe trauma and treating them accordingly, followed by stabilizing and evacuating the casualty with an MV-22 Osprey.
U.S. Navy sailors assigned to the 26th Marine Expeditionary Unit participate in a Tactical Evacuation Course at Camp Lejeune, N.C., June 27, 2017. The course consisted of corpsmen identifying dummy casualties and assessing them for injuries ranging from gunshot wounds, amputations to severe trauma and treating them accordingly, followed by stabilizing and evacuating the casualty with an MV-22 Osprey.
Marines assigned to the 26th Marine Expeditionary Unit provide air support for a Tactical Evacuation Course at Camp Lejeune, N.C., June 27, 2017. The course consisted of corpsmen identifying dummy casualties and assessing them for injuries ranging from gunshot wounds, amputations to severe trauma and treating them accordingly, followed by stabilizing and evacuating the casualty with an MV-22 Osprey.
Seaman Tyler Kelly, left, and Petty Officer 3rd Class Ginio Mares, right, provides medical care to a dummy during a Tactical Evacuation Course at Camp Lejeune, N.C., June 27, 2017. The course consisted of corpsmen identifying dummy casualties and assessing them for injuries ranging from gunshot wounds, amputations to severe trauma and treating them accordingly, followed by stabilizing and evacuating the casualty with an MV-22 Osprey.
U.S Marine Pfc. Brad A. Clark inspects the rigged aerial delivery systems of Joint Precision Airdrop Systems during a Weapons and Training Instructor Course March 30, 2017, at Marine Corps Air Station Yuma, Ariz. The JPADS systems use GPS, a modular autonomous guidance unit, or MAGU, a parachute and electric motors to guide cargo within 150 meters of their target points. Marine Corps Systems Command fielded the last of 162 JPADS to the fleet in April, turning the page from acquisition to sustainment of the system for the Corps. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Jocelyn Ontiveros)
U.S. Marines prepare Joint Precision Airdrop Systems for flight during Weapons and Tactics Instructors Course 2-17 on Marine Corps Air Station, Yuma, Ariz., March 30, 2017. The JPADS uses GPS, a modular autonomous guidance unit, a parachute and electric motors to guide cargo to their targeted drop zones. The Marines were with Landing Support Company, Transportation Support Battalion, Combat Logistics Regiment 1, 1st Marine Logistics Group and Landing Support Company, 2nd TSB, CLR- 2, 2nd MLG. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Roderick Jacquote)
A Joint Precision Airdrop System drops from an MV-22 Osprey during testing of the system Aug. 26, 2014, at Yuma Proving Ground, Ariz. The JPADS systems use GPS, a modular autonomous guidance unit, or MAGU, a parachute and electric motors to guide cargo within 150 meters of their target points. To test its precision, the Marines used a series of palletized loads attached to parachutes with the GPS integrated system and dropped them from various heights. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Laura Gauna/ released)
A set of MV-22B Osprey tiltrotor aircraft fly in formation above the Pacific Ocean off the coast of Sydney, Australia, June 29, 2017. The MV-22Bs belong to Marine Medium Tiltrotor Squadron 265. VMM-265 is part of the Aviation Combat Element of the 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit. The 31st MEU and the Bonhomme Richard Expeditionary Strike Group arrived in Sydney after transiting south across the vast Pacific Ocean, from Okinawa, Japan, to southeastern Australia in just over three weeks. Sydney is a favorite port stop for both Marines and Sailors crossing the Pacific. The 31st MEU partners with the Navy’s Amphibious Squadron 11 to form the amphibious component of the Bonhomme Richard Expeditionary Strike Group. The 31st MEU and PHIBRON 11 combine to provide a cohesive blue-green team capable of accomplishing a variety of missions across the Indo-Asia-Pacific region.
Warrant Officer Dan Pare, the explosive ordnance disposal officer for Special Purpose Marine Air-Ground Task Force-Crisis Response-Africa, speaks with Sub-officer Major Benito Florido Cauovas, the EOD sub-officer major for the Spanish Second Air Support Deployment Squadron (SEADA), during preparation for a live-fire explosive training at Morón Air Base, Spain, June 20, 2017. This was the first time, either jointly or separately, U.S. and Spanish EOD personnel conducted live, explosive ordnance training on the air base. (U. S. Marine Corps photo by Staff Sgt. Kenneth K. Trotter Jr./Released)
Warrant Officer Dan Pare, left, the explosive ordnance disposal officer for Special Purpose Marine Air-Ground Task Force-Crisis Response-Africa, speaks with Sub-officer Major Benito Florido Cauovas, the EOD sub-officer major for the Spanish Second Air Support Deployment Squadron (SEADA), who talks about some of the qualities of Spanish dynamite and what can be expected from it during a joint EOD live-fire demolition training at Morón Air Base, Spain, June 20, 2017. This was the first time, either jointly or separately, U.S. and Spanish EOD personnel conducted live, explosive ordnance training on the air base. (U. S. Marine Corps photo by Staff Sgt. Kenneth K. Trotter Jr./Released)
Dynamite explodes during live-fire demolition training between explosive ordnance disposal personnel of Special Purpose Marine Air-Ground Task Force-Crisis Response-Africa and Spanish Second Air Support Deployment Squadron (SEADA) at Morón Air Base, Spain, June 20, 2017. This was the first time, either jointly or separately, U.S. and Spanish EOD personnel conducted live, explosive ordnance training on the air base. (U. S. Marine Corps photo by Staff Sgt. Kenneth K. Trotter Jr./Released)
Warrant Officer Dan Pare, left, explosive ordnance disposal officer for Special Purpose Marine Air-Ground Task Force-Crisis Response-Africa, stands with EOD personnel of the Spanish Second Air Support Deployment Squadron (SEADA) after the successful completion of a joint explosive demolition training at Morón Air Base, Spain, June 20, 2017. This was the first time, either jointly or separately, U.S. and Spanish EOD personnel conducted live, explosive ordnance training on the air base. (U. S. Marine Corps photo by Staff Sgt. Kenneth K. Trotter Jr./Released)
Marching companies with Marine Barracks Washington D.C. perform “fix bayonets” during a Friday Evening Parade at the Barracks, June 23, 2017. The guest of honor for the parade was Lt. Gen. Thomas Trask, vice commander, United States Special Operations Command, and the hosting official was Lt. Gen. James Laster, director, Marine Corps Staff. (Official Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Robert Knapp/Released)
U.S. Marines with Task Force Koa Moana 17 hold striking pads for a member of the Kiribati National Police Maritime Unit while conducting striking drills on Betio Island, Tarawa Atoll, Kiribati, June 13, 2017. Koa Moana 17 is designed to improve theater security, law enforcement, and infantry training in the Pacific region in order to enhance interoperability with partner nations. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by MCIPAC Combat Camera Lance Cpl. Juan C. Bustos)