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U.S. Marine Sgt. Coltin Davenport, a forward observer, uses a laser to mark a target for a close air support mission the Canadian army and the Mexican navy during the Southern California portion of Rim of the Pacific 2016 training exercise at Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton, California, July 13, 2016. The close air support missions help redefine and refine tactics in close air support and will also serve to assist the Mexican navy for laying the ground work and foundation for a structured tactical air control party school in the future. Units participating in the exercise were Marines with 1st Air Naval Gunfire Liaison Company, Canada’s 2e Battalion Royal 22e Régiment, and service members with the Mexican navy. Twenty-six nations, more than 40 ships and submarines, more than 200 aircraft and 25,000 personnel are participating in RIMPAC from June 30 to Aug. 4, in and around the Hawaiian Islands and Southern California. The world's largest international maritime exercise, RIMPAC provides a unique training opportunity that helps participants foster and sustain the cooperative relationships that are critical to ensuring the safety of sea lanes and security on the world's oceans. RIMPAC 2016 is the 25th exercise in the series that began in 1971.
U.S. Marines provide cover for Mexican sailors as they participate in a mechanized assault during the Southern California portion of Rim of the Pacific 2016 at Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton, California, July 18, 2016. The purpose for the mechanized assault is so partner nations can integrate and communicate with each other for future operations. Units participating in the exercise were Marines with India Company, 3rd Battalion, 5th Marine Regiment and 3rd Assault Amphibious Battalion, both with the 1st Marine Division, and service members with the Mexican navy. Twenty-six nations, more than 40 ships and submarines, more than 200 aircraft and 25,000 personnel are participating in RIMPAC from June 30 to Aug. 4, in and around the Hawaiian Islands and Southern California. The world's largest international maritime exercise, RIMPAC provides a unique training opportunity that helps participants foster and sustain the cooperative relationships that are critical to ensuring the safety of sea lanes and security on the world's oceans. RIMPAC 2016 is the 25th exercise in the series that began in 1971.
Two Chilean service members post security in a cleared building during military operations on urban terrain training at Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton, California, July 19, 2016. The training was conducted with U.S., Chilean, and Canadian service members to enhance interoperability between partner nations. Twenty-six nations, more than 40 ships and submarines, more than 200 aircraft and 25,000 personnel are participating in RIMPAC from June 30 to Aug. 4, in and around the Hawaiian Islands and Southern California. The world's largest international maritime exercise, RIMPAC provides a unique training opportunity that helps participants foster and sustain the cooperative relationships that are critical to ensuring the safety of sea lanes and security on the world's oceans. RIMPAC 2016 is the 25th exercise in the series that began in 1971.
A U.S. Marine with 3rd Battalion, 5th Regiment, posts security during military operations on urban terrain training as part of the Rim of the Pacific Exercise in Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton, California, July 19, 2016. The training was conducted with U.S., Chilean, and Canadian service members to enhance interoperability between partner nations. The world's largest international maritime exercise, RIMPAC provides a unique training opportunity that helps participants foster and sustain the cooperative relationships that are critical to ensuring the safety of sea lanes and security on the world's oceans.
U.S. Marine Staff Sgt. Bryan Whitlatch provides cover for Mexican sailors as they participate in a mechanized assault during the Southern California portion of Rim of the Pacific Southern California portion of Rim of the Pacific 2016 at Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton, California, July 18, 2016. The purpose for the mechanized assault is so partner nations can integrate and communicate with each other for future operations. Units participating in the exercise were Marines with India Company, 3rd Battalion, 5th Marine Regiment and 3rd Assault Amphibious Battalion, both with the 1st Marine Division, and service members with the Mexican navy. Twenty-six nations, more than 40 ships and submarines, more than 200 aircraft and 25,000 personnel are participating in RIMPAC from June 30 to Aug. 4, in and around the Hawaiian Islands and Southern California. The world's largest international maritime exercise, RIMPAC provides a unique training opportunity that helps participants foster and sustain the cooperative relationships that are critical to ensuring the safety of sea lanes and security on the world's oceans. RIMPAC 2016 is the 25th exercise in the series that began in 1971.
U.S. Marines Lance Cpl. Connor J. Vermette and Cpl. Kyle W. Bagley level cement blocks during vertical construction training on Ovalau, Fiji, July 20, 2016. Fiji is part of Task Force Koa Moana’s deployment throughout the Asia-Pacific region, where Marines and Sailors will share engineering and infantry skills with the RFMF to strengthen mil-to-mil relationships and interoperability.
U.S. Marine Lance Cpl. Terrance L. Lee with Task Force Koa Moana 16.2 drinks cocoanut water for hydration during jungle survival training on Ovalua, Fiji, July 15, 2016. Marines applied survival techniques they have learned throughout their training with the RFMF. Fiji is part of Task Force Koa Moana’s deployment throughout the Asia-Pacific region, where Marines and Sailors will share engineering and infantry skills with the RFMF to strengthen mil-to-mil relationships and interoperability.
U.S. Marines with Task Force Koa Moana 16.2 and Soldiers from the Republic of Fiji Military Forces conduct jungle survival training on Ovalau, Fiji, July 15, 2016. Marines applied survival techniques they have learned throughout their training with the RFMF. Fiji is part of Task Force Koa Moana’s deployment throughout the Asia-Pacific region, where Marines and Sailors will share engineering and infantry skills with the RFMF to strengthen mil-to-mil relationships and interoperability.
U.S. Marine Lance Cpl. Terrance L. Lee with Task Force Koa Moana 16.2 constructs a shelter from surrounding vegetation during jungle survival training on Ovalau, Fiji, July 15, 2016. Marines applied survival techniques they have learned throughout their training with the RFMF. Fiji is part of Task Force Koa Moana’s deployment throughout the Asia-Pacific region, where Marines and Sailors will share engineering and infantry skills with the RFMF to strengthen mil-to-mil relationships and interoperability.
Republic of Fiji Military Forces Soldiers Spr. Tevita Cuvatoka levels cement blocks during vertical construction training on Ovalau, Fiji, July 20, 2016. Fiji is part of Task Force Koa Moana’s deployment throughout the Asia-Pacific region, where Marines and Sailors will share engineering and infantry skills with the RFMF to strengthen mil-to-mil relationships and interoperability.
U.S. Marine Pfc. Tyler 1Armentaro with Task Force Koa Moana 16.2, sharpens his wooden spear during jungle survival training on Ovalau, Fiji, July 15, 2016. Marines applied survival techniques they have learned throughout their training with the RFMF. Fiji is part of Task Force Koa Moana’s deployment throughout the Asia-Pacific region, where Marines and Sailors will share engineering and infantry skills with the RFMF to strengthen mil-to-mil relationships and interoperability.
U.S. Marine Cpl. Isaias Pachicano and Republic of Fiji Military Forces Soldier Spr. Tevita Cuvatoka lay down cement blocks during vertical construction training on Ovalau, Fiji, July 20, 2016. Fiji is part of Task Force Koa Moana’s deployment throughout the Asia-Pacific region, where Marines and Sailors will share engineering and infantry skills with the RFMF to strengthen mil-to-mil relationships and interoperability.
U.S. Marine Lance Cpl. Ethan F. Maltby and Fiji Military Forces Soldier Spr. Epeli Tukana reinforce cement blocks during vertical construction training on Ovalau, Fiji, July 20, 2016. Fiji is part of Task Force Koa Moana’s deployment throughout the Asia-Pacific region, where Marines and Sailors will share engineering and infantry skills with the RFMF to strengthen mil-to-mil relationships and interoperability.
A Marine with 2nd Explosive Ordnance Disposal Company, 8th Engineer Support Battalion cuts out a measured amount of C4 for a charge during a training exercise at Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune, N.C., July 19, 2016. The unit conducted the training to test the effects of different types of excavation charges.
Sgt. Anthony Carbajal, an explosive ordnance disposal team leader with 2nd EOD Company, 8th Engineer Support Battalion, molds two pieces of C2 during a training exercise at Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune, N.C., July 19, 2016. The unit conducted the training to test the effects of different types of excavation charges.
Sgt. David Jones, an explosive ordnance disposal team leader with 2nd EOD Company, 8th Engineer Support Battalion, scans the EOD lane for signs of an improvised explosive device during a training exercise at Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune, N.C., July 19, 2016. The unit conducted the training to test the effects of different types of excavation charges. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Victoria Ross)
Sgt. David Jones, an explosive ordnance disposal team leader with 2nd EOD Company, 8th Engineer Support Battalion, uncovers part of a controlled improvised explosive device during a training exercise at Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune, N.C., July 19, 2016. The unit conducted the training to test the effects of different types of excavation charges.
Sgt. Anthony Carbajal, an explosive ordnance disposal team leader with 2nd EOD Company, 8th Engineer Support Battalion, works on a safe detonating procedure during a training exercise at Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune, N.C., July 19, 2016. The unit conducted the training to test the effects of different types of excavation charges.
Sgt. Derek Turner, an explosive ordnance disposal technician with 2nd EOD Company, 8th Engineer Support Battalion, observes as Sgt. Anthony Carbajal digs around a controlled improvised explosive device during a training exercise at Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune, N.C., July 19, 2016. The unit conducted the training to test the effects of different types of excavation charges.
Sgt. Anthony Carbajal, an explosive ordnance disposal team leader with 2nd EOD Company, 8th Engineer Support Battalion, removes dirt surrounding a controlled improvised explosive device during a training exercise at Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune, N.C., July 19, 2016. The unit conducted the training to test the effects of different types of excavation charges.