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EOD conducts final field exercise in preparation for SPMAGTF-CR-AF

By Cpl. Paul S. Martinez, II Marine Expeditionary Force

Marines with Explosive Ordnance Disposal  Platoon, Combat Logistics Battalion 2, utilize a compact metal detector to sweep for improvised explosive devices during a field exercise at Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune, N.C., March 2, 2016. Marines utilized equipment such as compact metal detectors, bomb suits and a  TALON robot to locate and handle ordnance, which took the form of a simulated IED, ammunition or artillery shell.
EOD conducts final field exercise in preparation for SPMAGTF-CR-AF
Marines with Explosive Ordnance Disposal Platoon, Combat Logistics Battalion 2, utilize a compact metal detector to sweep for improvised explosive devices during a field exercise at Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune, N.C., March 2, 2016. Marines utilized equipment such as compact metal detectors, bomb suits and a TALON robot to locate and handle ordnance, which took the form of a simulated IED, ammunition or artillery shell.
A TALON robot, operated by Marines with Explosive Ordnance Disposal  Platoon, Combat Logistics Battalion 2, scouts an area for improved explosive devices during a field exercise at Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune, N.C., March 2, 2016. The training served as the last field operation prior to the battalion’s upcoming deployment with the Special Purpose Marine-Air Ground Task Force-Crisis Response-Africa.
EOD conducts final field exercise in preparation for SPMAGTF-CR-AF
A TALON robot, operated by Marines with Explosive Ordnance Disposal Platoon, Combat Logistics Battalion 2, scouts an area for improved explosive devices during a field exercise at Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune, N.C., March 2, 2016. The training served as the last field operation prior to the battalion’s upcoming deployment with the Special Purpose Marine-Air Ground Task Force-Crisis Response-Africa.
A Marine with  Explosive Ordnance Disposal Platoon, Combat Logistics Battalion 2, places a sandbag during a field exercise at Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune, N.C., March 2, 2016. Marines used equipment such as compact metal detectors, bomb suits and a TALON robot to locate and handle ordnance, which took the form of a simulated IED, ammunition or artillery shell.
EOD conducts final field exercise in preparation for SPMAGTF-CR-AF
A Marine with Explosive Ordnance Disposal Platoon, Combat Logistics Battalion 2, places a sandbag during a field exercise at Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune, N.C., March 2, 2016. Marines used equipment such as compact metal detectors, bomb suits and a TALON robot to locate and handle ordnance, which took the form of a simulated IED, ammunition or artillery shell.
Marines with Explosive Ordnance Disposal Platoon, Combat Logistics Battalion 2, conducted a field training exercise at Camp Lejeune, March 2.

The training served as the last field operation prior to the battalion’s upcoming deployment with the Special Purpose Marine-Air Ground Task Force-Crisis Response-Africa, wherein they will be supporting operations across the Mediterranean Sea.

“We want all of our team leaders and members on the same page to be able to handle any and all situations we may come across,” said Staff Sgt. Ryan Harris, a Team Leader with the platoon.

The unit rehearsed procedures such as how to respond to calls both inside the United States, and abroad, and the follow-on actions after those calls were received.

“We’re testing our teams to see how well we can respond to explosives and thus get ourselves ready for our upcoming deployment,” said Sgt. Perry Robinson, a Team Member with the unit.

Marines utilized equipment such as compact metal detectors, bomb suits and a TALON robot to locate and handle suspected explosive devices, which took the form of a simulated IED, ammunition or artillery shell.

Marines then analyzed their suspected item before determining the necessary tools and used explosives such as C4, dynamite and TNT, to dispose of their objectives.

Robinson explained the value of proficiency with EOD equipment given the inherent danger of the tasks they are specifically entrusted with.

“We send the robot down first to be as remote as possible and to maintain the safety of the team,” Robinson said. “If we can’t accomplish the objective with the robot, we suit up and send our own Marines down.”

Robinson noted that the deployment may see them called into action at any moment, so the unit conducts this training to be ready when that time comes.

“This training is important because this gets our section ready so we may respond to a number of scenarios at any location around the Mediterranean,” Robinson said. “We need to be up to the standard needed for a response.”

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