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Republic of Korea and U.S. Marines clear a building during Korean Marine Exchange Program 15-17 Feb. 9 at the Cham Sae Mi Close-Quarters Battle Training Facility in Pohang, Republic of Korea. KMEP 15-17 is a regularly-scheduled, bilateral, small-unit training exercise, which enhances the combat readiness and interoperability of ROK and U.S. Marine Corps forces. The ROK Marines are with Company 5, 32nd Battalion, 1st ROK Marine Division. The U.S. Marines are with Company I, 3rd Battalion, 3rd Marine Regiment, currently assigned to 4th Marine Regiment, 3rd Marine Division, III Marine Expeditionary Force under the unit deployment program. - Republic of Korea and U.S. Marines clear a building during Korean Marine Exchange Program 15-17 Feb. 9 at the Cham Sae Mi Close-Quarters Battle Training Facility in Pohang, Republic of Korea. KMEP 15-17 is a regularly-scheduled, bilateral, small-unit training exercise, which enhances the combat readiness and interoperability of ROK and U.S. Marine Corps forces. The ROK Marines are with Company 5, 32nd Battalion, 1st ROK Marine Division. The U.S. Marines are with Company I, 3rd Battalion, 3rd Marine Regiment, currently assigned to 4th Marine Regiment, 3rd Marine Division, III Marine Expeditionary Force under the unit deployment program.

U.S. Marine Cpl. Alex S. Rankin, center, digs a hiding position alongside Republic of Korea Marines during Korean Marine Exchange Program 15-4 Feb. 4 at the Pyeongchang Winter Training Facility, Pyeongchang, Republic of Korea. The ROK recon Marines specialize in stealth and scouting, so this training teaches the Marines how to survive without getting caught and still accomplishing the mission. This exercise highlights the two countries’ combined commitment to the defense of the ROK and peace and security in the region. Rankin, a Secane, Pennsylvania, native, is an intelligence specialist with Company L, 3rd Battalion, 3rd Marine Regiment, currently assigned to 4th Marine Regiment, 3rd Marine Division, III Marine Expeditionary Force under the unit deployment program. The ROK Marines are with 1st Reconnaissance Battalion, 1st ROK Marine Division. - U.S. Marine Cpl. Alex S. Rankin, center, digs a hiding position alongside Republic of Korea Marines during Korean Marine Exchange Program 15-4 Feb. 4 at the Pyeongchang Winter Training Facility, Pyeongchang, Republic of Korea. The ROK recon Marines specialize in stealth and scouting, so this training teaches the Marines how to survive without getting caught and still accomplishing the mission. This exercise highlights the two countries’ combined commitment to the defense of the ROK and peace and security in the region. Rankin, a Secane, Pennsylvania, native, is an intelligence specialist with Company L, 3rd Battalion, 3rd Marine Regiment, currently assigned to 4th Marine Regiment, 3rd Marine Division, III Marine Expeditionary Force under the unit deployment program. The ROK Marines are with 1st Reconnaissance Battalion, 1st ROK Marine Division.

Republic of Korea Marines demonstrate their combat tactics for U.S. Marines during Korean Marine Exchange Program 15-4 Feb. 4 at the Pyeongchang Winter Training Facility, Pyeongchang, Republic of Korea. Sharing cultures is a significant factor in gaining a better understanding of the combat tactics of the two forces despite the language barrier, according to ROK Marine Capt. Moon Jung Hwan. KMEP is a regularly scheduled, bilateral, small-unit training exercise, which enhances the combat readiness and interoperability of ROK and U.S. Marine Corps’ forces. The ROK Marines are with 1st Reconnaissance Battalion, 1st ROK Marine Division. The U.S. Marines are with Company L, 3rd Battalion, 3rd Marine Regiment, currently assigned to 4th Marine Regiment, 3rd Marine Division, III Marine Expeditionary Force under the unit deployment program. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Pfc. Cedric R. Haller II/Released) - Republic of Korea Marines demonstrate their combat tactics for U.S. Marines during Korean Marine Exchange Program 15-4 Feb. 4 at the Pyeongchang Winter Training Facility, Pyeongchang, Republic of Korea. Sharing cultures is a significant factor in gaining a better understanding of the combat tactics of the two forces despite the language barrier, according to ROK Marine Capt. Moon Jung Hwan. KMEP is a regularly scheduled, bilateral, small-unit training exercise, which enhances the combat readiness and interoperability of ROK and U.S. Marine Corps’ forces. The ROK Marines are with 1st Reconnaissance Battalion, 1st ROK Marine Division. The U.S. Marines are with Company L, 3rd Battalion, 3rd Marine Regiment, currently assigned to 4th Marine Regiment, 3rd Marine Division, III Marine Expeditionary Force under the unit deployment program. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Pfc. Cedric R. Haller II/Released)

U.S. Marine Lt. Col. Nicholas Davis, left, presents Japan Ground Self-Defense Force Col. Hiroji Yamashita with a plaque, Dec. 12, during the closing ceremony for Forest Light 15-1 at Camp Kita Kumamoto in Kumamoto, Kumamoto prefecture, Japan. Forest Light is a routine, semi-annual exercise designed to enhance the U.S. and Japan military partnership, solidify regional security agreements and improve individual and unit-level skills. Davis is the commanding officer of 2nd Battalion, 9th Marine Regiment, currently assigned to 4th Marine Regiment, 3rd Marine Division, III Marine Expeditionary Force, under the unit deployment program. Yamashita is the commanding officer of the 42nd Regiment, 8th Division, Western Army, JGSDF. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Drew Tech/Released) - U.S. Marine Lt. Col. Nicholas Davis, left, presents Japan Ground Self-Defense Force Col. Hiroji Yamashita with a plaque, Dec. 12, during the closing ceremony for Forest Light 15-1 at Camp Kita Kumamoto in Kumamoto, Kumamoto prefecture, Japan. Forest Light is a routine, semi-annual exercise designed to enhance the U.S. and Japan military partnership, solidify regional security agreements and improve individual and unit-level skills. Davis is the commanding officer of 2nd Battalion, 9th Marine Regiment, currently assigned to 4th Marine Regiment, 3rd Marine Division, III Marine Expeditionary Force, under the unit deployment program. Yamashita is the commanding officer of the 42nd Regiment, 8th Division, Western Army, JGSDF. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Drew Tech/Released)

Marines check the GPS coordinates of their M777A2 lightweight 155 mm howitzers Oct. 30 during a command post exercise for Artillery Relocation Training Program 14-3. “Camp Fuji provides that cold weather training environment that artillery units need to be familiar with,” said Sgt. Maj. Marvin M. Magcale, the battalion sergeant major for 3rd Battalion, 12th Marines. “The Marines and sailors in this battalion will be better prepared to accomplish the mission involving cold weather. Austere conditions obviously affect not only the Marines and sailors, but their equipment as well.” The Marines are with Battery B, 1st Bn., 12th Marine Regiment, 1st Marine Division, based out of Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii, and are currently assigned to 3rd Bn., 12th Marines, 3rd Marine Division, III Marine Expeditionary Force under the unit deployment program. - Marines check the GPS coordinates of their M777A2 lightweight 155 mm howitzers Oct. 30 during a command post exercise for Artillery Relocation Training Program 14-3. “Camp Fuji provides that cold weather training environment that artillery units need to be familiar with,” said Sgt. Maj. Marvin M. Magcale, the battalion sergeant major for 3rd Battalion, 12th Marines. “The Marines and sailors in this battalion will be better prepared to accomplish the mission involving cold weather. Austere conditions obviously affect not only the Marines and sailors, but their equipment as well.” The Marines are with Battery B, 1st Bn., 12th Marine Regiment, 1st Marine Division, based out of Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii, and are currently assigned to 3rd Bn., 12th Marines, 3rd Marine Division, III Marine Expeditionary Force under the unit deployment program.

Japan Ground Self-Defense Force Sgt. 1st Class Yatsuka Ikeda, left, helps U.S. Marine 1st Sgt. Timothy Babcock set up the American flag Dec. 1 before the opening ceremony for Forest Light 15-1 at the Oyanohara Training Area in Yamato, Kumamoto prefecture, Japan. Forest Light demonstrates the continued commitment of the U.S. and Japan to increase interoperability of our armed forces and maintain a strong partnership to protect Japan from external aggression. Ikeda is with 42nd Regiment, 8th Division, Western Army, JGSDF. Babcock, from Port Austin, Michigan, is company first sergeant with Company G, 2nd Battalion, 9th Marine Regiment, currently attached to 4th Marine Regiment, 3rd Marine Division, III Marine Expeditionary Force, under the unit deployment program. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Drew Tech/Released) - Japan Ground Self-Defense Force Sgt. 1st Class Yatsuka Ikeda, left, helps U.S. Marine 1st Sgt. Timothy Babcock set up the American flag Dec. 1 before the opening ceremony for Forest Light 15-1 at the Oyanohara Training Area in Yamato, Kumamoto prefecture, Japan. Forest Light demonstrates the continued commitment of the U.S. and Japan to increase interoperability of our armed forces and maintain a strong partnership to protect Japan from external aggression. Ikeda is with 42nd Regiment, 8th Division, Western Army, JGSDF. Babcock, from Port Austin, Michigan, is company first sergeant with Company G, 2nd Battalion, 9th Marine Regiment, currently attached to 4th Marine Regiment, 3rd Marine Division, III Marine Expeditionary Force, under the unit deployment program. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Drew Tech/Released)

U.S. Marine Lance Cpl. Jonas G. Dewald works with a fellow Marine to don his ghillie suit Dec. 2 in the Oyanohara Training Area in Yamato, Kumamoto prefecture, Japan. The concealment training is part of Forest Light 15-1, a semi-annual, bilateral exercise consisting of a command post exercise and field training events conducted by elements of III Marine Expeditionary Force and the Japan Ground Self-Defense Force to enhance the U.S. and Japan military partnership, solidify regional security agreements and improve individual and unit-level skills. Dewald, from Wilson, North Carolina, is a machine gunner with Weapons Company, 2nd Battalion, 9th Marine Regiment, currently attached to 4th Marine Regiment, 3rd Marine Division, III MEF, under the unit deployment program. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Drew Tech/Released) - U.S. Marine Lance Cpl. Jonas G. Dewald works with a fellow Marine to don his ghillie suit Dec. 2 in the Oyanohara Training Area in Yamato, Kumamoto prefecture, Japan. The concealment training is part of Forest Light 15-1, a semi-annual, bilateral exercise consisting of a command post exercise and field training events conducted by elements of III Marine Expeditionary Force and the Japan Ground Self-Defense Force to enhance the U.S. and Japan military partnership, solidify regional security agreements and improve individual and unit-level skills. Dewald, from Wilson, North Carolina, is a machine gunner with Weapons Company, 2nd Battalion, 9th Marine Regiment, currently attached to 4th Marine Regiment, 3rd Marine Division, III MEF, under the unit deployment program. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Drew Tech/Released)

Marines load a diver propulsion device into a combat rubber raiding craft Sept. 20 at U.S. Naval Base Guam during Exercise Valiant Shield 2014. The device aids the Marines conducting night infiltration. Valiant Shield is a U.S.-only exercise integrating Navy, Air Force, Army, and Marine Corps assets, offering real-world joint operational experience to develop capabilities, which provide a full range of options to defend U.S. interests and those of its allies and partners. The Marines are reconnaissance men with 3rd Reconnaissance Battalion, 3rd Marine Division, III Marine Expeditionary Force. - Marines load a diver propulsion device into a combat rubber raiding craft Sept. 20 at U.S. Naval Base Guam during Exercise Valiant Shield 2014. The device aids the Marines conducting night infiltration. Valiant Shield is a U.S.-only exercise integrating Navy, Air Force, Army, and Marine Corps assets, offering real-world joint operational experience to develop capabilities, which provide a full range of options to defend U.S. interests and those of its allies and partners. The Marines are reconnaissance men with 3rd Reconnaissance Battalion, 3rd Marine Division, III Marine Expeditionary Force.

Marine infantrymen make their way to a compound held by Guam Army National Guard who are acting as an opposing force Sept. 20 during the island seizure portion of Exercise Valiant Shield 2014 at Tinian’s North Field. The Marines were transported from Okinawa to Guam and from there to Tinian. Valiant Shield is a U.S.-only exercise integrating Navy, Air Force, Army, and Marine Corps assets, offering real-world joint operational experience to develop capabilities that provide a full range of options to defend U.S. interests and those of its allies and partners. The Marines are with Company A, 1st Battalion, 3rd Marine Regiment, 3rd Marine Division, III Marine Expeditionary Force. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. D. A. Walters/ Released) - Marine infantrymen make their way to a compound held by Guam Army National Guard who are acting as an opposing force Sept. 20 during the island seizure portion of Exercise Valiant Shield 2014 at Tinian’s North Field. The Marines were transported from Okinawa to Guam and from there to Tinian. Valiant Shield is a U.S.-only exercise integrating Navy, Air Force, Army, and Marine Corps assets, offering real-world joint operational experience to develop capabilities that provide a full range of options to defend U.S. interests and those of its allies and partners. The Marines are with Company A, 1st Battalion, 3rd Marine Regiment, 3rd Marine Division, III Marine Expeditionary Force. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. D. A. Walters/ Released)

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