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U.S. Marine Corps Master Sgt. Christopher Lisle, Regional Expeditionary Firefighting and Rescue Chief with Marine Aircraft Control Group-28, left, and Lance Cpl. Devin Lisle, firefighter with Headquarters and Headquarters Squadron 751, father and son, pose for a photo on Marine Corps Air Station New River, in Jacksonville, North Carolina, May 12, 2023. This marked Master Sgt. Lisle’s last live fire training of his career, putting out the fire with his son by his side. - U.S. Marine Corps Master Sgt. Christopher Lisle, Regional Expeditionary Firefighting and Rescue Chief with Marine Aircraft Control Group-28, left, and Lance Cpl. Devin Lisle, firefighter with Headquarters and Headquarters Squadron 751, father and son, pose for a photo on Marine Corps Air Station New River, in Jacksonville, North Carolina, May 12, 2023. This marked Master Sgt. Lisle’s last live fire training of his career, putting out the fire with his son by his side.

Mark Blake, Quantico Fire & Emergency Services, conducts controlled burns at Marine Corps Base Quantico, Virginia, March 9, 2023. According to the NREA, the purpose of the burns is to reduce fuel litter, minimize the potential of wildfires, and promote wildlife habitat. Fuel litter is dead and trodden woody debris that could be used as fuel for wildfires or other potential hazards.In addition, excess foliage can disrupt the natural flow of nutrients throughout the soil and ecosystem as a whole. The burns are carried out multiple times throughout the year to achieve maximum results. Other benefits of conducting the controlled burns include the mitigation of pests and diseases, native plant reduction, and control of invasive species. - Mark Blake, Quantico Fire & Emergency Services, conducts controlled burns at Marine Corps Base Quantico, Virginia, March 9, 2023. According to the NREA, the purpose of the burns is to reduce fuel litter, minimize the potential of wildfires, and promote wildlife habitat. Fuel litter is dead and trodden woody debris that could be used as fuel for wildfires or other potential hazards. In addition, excess foliage can disrupt the natural flow of nutrients throughout the soil and ecosystem as a whole. The burns are carried out multiple times throughout the year to achieve maximum results. Other benefits of conducting the controlled burns include the mitigation of pests and diseases, native plant reduction, and control of invasive species.

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