REVIEW OF PHYSICAL FITNESS AND BODY COMPOSITION STANDARDS

Date Signed: 11/9/2015
ALMARS Active Number: 030/15

R 091828Z NOV 15
ALMAR 030/15
MSGID/GENADMIN,USMTF,2007/CMC WASHINGTON DC DMCS(UC)/F002//
SUBJ/REVIEW OF PHYSICAL FITNESS AND BODY COMPOSITION STANDARDS//
GENTEXT/REMARKS/1.  My initial travels as Commandant have reinforced my confidence in the quality of our Corps and the innate desire to succeed and win that resides in each and every Marine.  I’ve asked you to share what is on your minds and many have provided pertinent questions and insightful ideas.  A recurring theme I hear centers on physical training standards and what changes we might make to improve overall fitness and readiness.
2.  Therefore, based on your feedback, I am directing a comprehensive review of our Physical Fitness Program, including the scoring tables of the Physical Fitness Test (PFT) and Combat Fitness Test (CFT), and body composition (BC) height/weight and body fat standards for both male and female Marines.  Training and Education Command will conduct this review during the current fiscal year and deliver recommendations for my decision as quickly as feasible, but no later than 1 July 2016.  While the review is conducted, and pending any changes that result, current standards for both male and female Marines remain in effect.  All Marines are encouraged to continue all forms of resistance training as a means for developing dynamic upper body strength, but females will maintain the current option of either flexed arm hang or pull-ups during scored PFTs until any new policy is implemented.
3.  At the end of the review, the end state is for a Marine Corps Physical Fitness Program that ensures the overall health and fitness of our Corps.  PFT, CFT, and BC standards must be relevant, challenging, and incentivize behaviors that enhance cardiovascular capacity, muscular strength, flexibility, agility, and the reduction of injuries.  As each of us must be physically ready to answer the call in any clime or place, we must continue to train hard but smart, and push ourselves to reach the highest level of personal fitness.
4.  Robert B. Neller, General, U.S. Marine Corps, Commandant of the Marine Corps.//