News
The latest news and the coverage of news, events, videos, tweets and more from the U.S. Marine Corps.
Filter
Results:
Tag: Marine Corps Air Station Cherry Point
CLEAR ALL

Lance Cpl. Marc Arrigo prepares to fire the M-240 Bravo as Lance Cpl. Mason McLaughlin acts as his spotter during a live-fire training exercise conducted by 2nd Low Altitude Air Defense Battalion, Marine Air Control Group 28, 2nd Marine Aircraft Wing at Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune, N.C., Aug. 29-30. The exercise allowed Marines to re-familiarize themselves and qualify with the M-240 Bravo machine gun, M249 Squad Automatic Weapon, and the M2 Browning .50 caliber machine gun during the unknown distance live-fire exercise. Arrigo and McLaughlin are gunners with 2nd LAAD. - Lance Cpl. Marc Arrigo prepares to fire the M-240 Bravo as Lance Cpl. Mason McLaughlin acts as his spotter during a live-fire training exercise conducted by 2nd Low Altitude Air Defense Battalion, Marine Air Control Group 28, 2nd Marine Aircraft Wing at Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune, N.C., Aug. 29-30. The exercise allowed Marines to re-familiarize themselves and qualify with the M-240 Bravo machine gun, M249 Squad Automatic Weapon, and the M2 Browning .50 caliber machine gun during the unknown distance live-fire exercise. Arrigo and McLaughlin are gunners with 2nd LAAD.

Cpl. Joseph Currey, left, salutes Lt. Col. Jeremy Winters, right, during an award ceremony at Marine Corps Air Station Cherry Point, North Carolina, March 1, 2016. Currey was awarded the Navy and Marine Corps Commendation Medal for his actions after witnessing an ambulance wreck. Currey demonstrated his devotion to serving others as he placed the well-being of the injured personnel above his own by running towards the scene of an accident and rendering aide to those need. Currey is an air support operations operator with Marine Aviation Support Squadron 1. - Cpl. Joseph Currey, left, salutes Lt. Col. Jeremy Winters, right, during an award ceremony at Marine Corps Air Station Cherry Point, North Carolina, March 1, 2016. Currey was awarded the Navy and Marine Corps Commendation Medal for his actions after witnessing an ambulance wreck. Currey demonstrated his devotion to serving others as he placed the well-being of the injured personnel above his own by running towards the scene of an accident and rendering aide to those need. Currey is an air support operations operator with Marine Aviation Support Squadron 1.

Four EA-6B Prowlers belonging to each Prowler squadron aboard Marine Corps Air Station Cherry Point conducted a "Final Four" division flight aboard the air station March 1, 2016. The "Final Four" flight is the last time the Prowler squadrons will be flying together before the official retirement of Marine Tactical Electronic Warfare Training Squadron 1 at the end of Fiscal Year 16 and the eventual transition to "MAGTF EW". MAGTF EW is a more distributed strategy where every platform contributes to the EW mission, enabling relevant tactical information to move throughout the electromagnetic spectrum and across the battlefield faster than ever before. - Four EA-6B Prowlers belonging to each Prowler squadron aboard Marine Corps Air Station Cherry Point conducted a "Final Four" division flight aboard the air station March 1, 2016. The "Final Four" flight is the last time the Prowler squadrons will be flying together before the official retirement of Marine Tactical Electronic Warfare Training Squadron 1 at the end of Fiscal Year 16 and the eventual transition to "MAGTF EW". MAGTF EW is a more distributed strategy where every platform contributes to the EW mission, enabling relevant tactical information to move throughout the electromagnetic spectrum and across the battlefield faster than ever before.

Sergeant Maj. Rogelio Deleon swims in a combat pool at Marine Corps Air Station Cherry Point, N.C., Feb. 17, 2016. More than 85 noncommissioned officers with Marine Wing Communications Squadron 28 participated in the physical training exercise “Chaos,” which tested their warfighting abilities: strength, communication and dependability. During the training the Marines were put into fire teams where they had to navigate the obstacle course, trek through the combat pool and hike one-mile with a simulated casualty and assault load. The purpose of the event was to build on unit cohesion, esprit de corps and mental and physical resiliency. Deleon is the sergeant major of MWCS-28. - Sergeant Maj. Rogelio Deleon swims in a combat pool at Marine Corps Air Station Cherry Point, N.C., Feb. 17, 2016. More than 85 noncommissioned officers with Marine Wing Communications Squadron 28 participated in the physical training exercise “Chaos,” which tested their warfighting abilities: strength, communication and dependability. During the training the Marines were put into fire teams where they had to navigate the obstacle course, trek through the combat pool and hike one-mile with a simulated casualty and assault load. The purpose of the event was to build on unit cohesion, esprit de corps and mental and physical resiliency. Deleon is the sergeant major of MWCS-28.

Lance Cpl. Quentin J. Stallings, left, and Lance Cpl. Kyle H. Clemens, right, configure the settings on a water pump and filter at Marine Corps Auxiliary Landing Field Bogue, N.C., Dec. 9, 2015. Marines with Marine Wing Support Squadron 271’s Engineer Company participated in a cantonment and capabilities field exercise to practice and improve their knowledge of their jobs while in a deployed environment. The week-long exercise featured events such as airfield damage repair, water purification, medium and heavy lifting missions, with the construction of an expedient road for a vertical take-off and landing aircraft pad. Stallings and Clemens are both water support technicians with MWSS-271. - Lance Cpl. Quentin J. Stallings, left, and Lance Cpl. Kyle H. Clemens, right, configure the settings on a water pump and filter at Marine Corps Auxiliary Landing Field Bogue, N.C., Dec. 9, 2015. Marines with Marine Wing Support Squadron 271’s Engineer Company participated in a cantonment and capabilities field exercise to practice and improve their knowledge of their jobs while in a deployed environment. The week-long exercise featured events such as airfield damage repair, water purification, medium and heavy lifting missions, with the construction of an expedient road for a vertical take-off and landing aircraft pad. Stallings and Clemens are both water support technicians with MWSS-271.

Master Sgt. Donald Johnson prepares M67 fragmentation grenades during a grenade and MK-19 Grenade Launcher range at Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune, N.C., Oct. 28, 2015. More than 70 Marines with 2nd Low Altitude Air Defense Battalion took turns handling the MK19 and handheld grenades during the familiarization range. The range offered Marines the opportunity to build confidence and proficiency skills on some of the crew-served weapons they operate while providing security in a deployed environment. Johnson is the 24th Marine Expeditionary Unit Detachment staff noncommissioned officer in charge with the battalion. - Master Sgt. Donald Johnson prepares M67 fragmentation grenades during a grenade and MK-19 Grenade Launcher range at Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune, N.C., Oct. 28, 2015. More than 70 Marines with 2nd Low Altitude Air Defense Battalion took turns handling the MK19 and handheld grenades during the familiarization range. The range offered Marines the opportunity to build confidence and proficiency skills on some of the crew-served weapons they operate while providing security in a deployed environment. Johnson is the 24th Marine Expeditionary Unit Detachment staff noncommissioned officer in charge with the battalion.

A Marine fires an FIM-92 Stinger Missile at a target during a stinger simulation training range at Marine Corps Air Station Cherry Point, North Carolina, Sept. 24, 2015. Marines with 2nd Low Altitude Air Defense Battalion sharpened their proficiency skills by simulating the weight transfer felt when firing the 34.2 pound missile. The weapon is a personal and portable infrared, homing, surface-to-air missile capable of tracking and engaging aircraft up to an altitude of 10,000 feet and covering distances up to eight kilometers. 2nd LAAD utilizes the stinger missile to provide ground-to-air defense to the 2nd Marine Aircraft Wing and Marine Air-Ground Task Force elements. - A Marine fires an FIM-92 Stinger Missile at a target during a stinger simulation training range at Marine Corps Air Station Cherry Point, North Carolina, Sept. 24, 2015. Marines with 2nd Low Altitude Air Defense Battalion sharpened their proficiency skills by simulating the weight transfer felt when firing the 34.2 pound missile. The weapon is a personal and portable infrared, homing, surface-to-air missile capable of tracking and engaging aircraft up to an altitude of 10,000 feet and covering distances up to eight kilometers. 2nd LAAD utilizes the stinger missile to provide ground-to-air defense to the 2nd Marine Aircraft Wing and Marine Air-Ground Task Force elements.

Marines TV: Delta Company Motivational Run