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Ships of the America and Essex Amphibious Ready Groups, and Carrier Strike Group 3, sail in formation with the Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force during exercise Noble Fusion. Left to right: USS Dewey (DDG 105), USS Ashland (LSD 48), JS Kongō (DDG 173), USS Miguel Keith (ESB 5), USS America (LHA 6), USS Mobile Bay (CG 53), USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72), USS Spruance (DDG 111), USS Essex (LHD 2), landing crafts, air cushion from Assault Craft Unit (ACU) 5. Noble Fusion demonstrates that Navy and Marine Corps forward-deployed stand-in naval expeditionary forces can rapidly aggregate Marine Expeditionary Unit/Amphibious Ready Group teams at sea, along with a carrier strike group, as well as other joint force elements and allies, in order to conduct lethal sea-denial operations, seize key maritime terrain, guarantee freedom of movement, and create advantage for U.S., partner and allied forces. Naval Expeditionary forces conduct training throughout the year, in the Indo-Pacific, to maintain readiness. - Ships of the America and Essex Amphibious Ready Groups, and Carrier Strike Group 3, sail in formation with the Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force during exercise Noble Fusion. Left to right: USS Dewey (DDG 105), USS Ashland (LSD 48), JS Kongō (DDG 173), USS Miguel Keith (ESB 5), USS America (LHA 6), USS Mobile Bay (CG 53), USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72), USS Spruance (DDG 111), USS Essex (LHD 2), landing crafts, air cushion from Assault Craft Unit (ACU) 5. Noble Fusion demonstrates that Navy and Marine Corps forward-deployed stand-in naval expeditionary forces can rapidly aggregate Marine Expeditionary Unit/Amphibious Ready Group teams at sea, along with a carrier strike group, as well as other joint force elements and allies, in order to conduct lethal sea-denial operations, seize key maritime terrain, guarantee freedom of movement, and create advantage for U.S., partner and allied forces. Naval Expeditionary forces conduct training throughout the year, in the Indo-Pacific, to maintain readiness.

Aviation Boatswain’s Mate 3rd Class Shelby Mann, from Udall, Kan., assigned to the forward-deployed amphibious assault ship USS America (LHA 6), signals a CH-47J Chinook helicopter from the Japan Ground Self-Defense Force to take off from the ship’s flight deck during Exercise Noble Fusion, Feb. 6, 2022. Noble Fusion demonstrates that Navy and Marine Corps forward-deployed stand-in naval expeditionary forces can rapidly aggregate Marine Expeditionary Unit/Amphibious Ready Group teams at sea, along with a carrier strike group, as well as other joint force elements and allies, in order to conduct lethal sea-denial operations, seize key maritime terrain, guarantee freedom of movement, and create advantage for U.S., partner and allied forces. Naval Expeditionary forces conduct training throughout the year, in the Indo-Pacific, to maintain readiness. - Aviation Boatswain’s Mate 3rd Class Shelby Mann, from Udall, Kan., assigned to the forward-deployed amphibious assault ship USS America (LHA 6), signals a CH-47J Chinook helicopter from the Japan Ground Self-Defense Force to take off from the ship’s flight deck during Exercise Noble Fusion, Feb. 6, 2022. Noble Fusion demonstrates that Navy and Marine Corps forward-deployed stand-in naval expeditionary forces can rapidly aggregate Marine Expeditionary Unit/Amphibious Ready Group teams at sea, along with a carrier strike group, as well as other joint force elements and allies, in order to conduct lethal sea-denial operations, seize key maritime terrain, guarantee freedom of movement, and create advantage for U.S., partner and allied forces. Naval Expeditionary forces conduct training throughout the year, in the Indo-Pacific, to maintain readiness.

Marines with Combined Anti-Armor Team 1 (CAAT), Battalion Landing Team, 2nd Battalion, 4th Marines, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit (MEU), clean the beach at Kin Blue, Okinawa, Japan, July 25, 2020. At the conclusion of their training, CAAT-1 picked up trash that had washed up on the beach in order to leave the environment better than they found it. The 31st MEU, the Marine Corps’ only continuously forward-deployed MEU, provides a flexible and lethal force ready to perform a wide range of military operations as the premier crisis response force in the Indo-Pacific region. The 31st MEU has implemented strict health protection measures and will continue to conduct mission essential training in support of regional security and stability. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Kolby Leger) - Marines with Combined Anti-Armor Team 1 (CAAT), Battalion Landing Team, 2nd Battalion, 4th Marines, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit (MEU), clean the beach at Kin Blue, Okinawa, Japan, July 25, 2020. At the conclusion of their training, CAAT-1 picked up trash that had washed up on the beach in order to leave the environment better than they found it. The 31st MEU, the Marine Corps’ only continuously forward-deployed MEU, provides a flexible and lethal force ready to perform a wide range of military operations as the premier crisis response force in the Indo-Pacific region. The 31st MEU has implemented strict health protection measures and will continue to conduct mission essential training in support of regional security and stability. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Kolby Leger)

Marines TV: Golf Company Graduation at MCRD San Diego