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Appearing in authentic 1945-1948 Marine Corps dress blues with original regalia, 96-year-old World War II veteran and Marine Raider Cpl. Leonard B. Turner, oldest Marine present, stands next to 19-year-old Pfc. Ivan K. Lopez, the youngest Marine present, during the Marine Forces Special Operations Command’s 244th Marine Corps Birthday Ball in Wilmington, N.C., Nov. 2, 2019. Every year, each Marine Corps unit comes together and hosts a Marine Corps Birthday cake cutting to celebrate one more year since the birth of their Corps. This celebration is an event that brings together Marines, old and young - enlisted and retired, and allows them to celebrate their commitment and dedication to the Marine Corps and strengthen their camaraderie and organizational esprit de corps. This connection between the past and present can be seen throughout many traditions during the Marine Corps ball and is the foundation of this event each year. One such tradition is the passing of birthday cake from the oldest Marine to the youngest Marine, which represents the passing of experience and knowledge from older generations to the newest generation of Marines. The birthday cake is traditionally cut with the Mameluke sword, to honor Lieutenant Presley O’Bannon’s assault of Derna, Tripoli in 1805, as a reminder that Marines are a band of warriors, committed to carrying the sword, so that the nation may live in peace. - Appearing in authentic 1945-1948 Marine Corps dress blues with original regalia, 96-year-old World War II veteran and Marine Raider Cpl. Leonard B. Turner, oldest Marine present, stands next to 19-year-old Pfc. Ivan K. Lopez, the youngest Marine present, during the Marine Forces Special Operations Command’s 244th Marine Corps Birthday Ball in Wilmington, N.C., Nov. 2, 2019. Every year, each Marine Corps unit comes together and hosts a Marine Corps Birthday cake cutting to celebrate one more year since the birth of their Corps. This celebration is an event that brings together Marines, old and young - enlisted and retired, and allows them to celebrate their commitment and dedication to the Marine Corps and strengthen their camaraderie and organizational esprit de corps. This connection between the past and present can be seen throughout many traditions during the Marine Corps ball and is the foundation of this event each year. One such tradition is the passing of birthday cake from the oldest Marine to the youngest Marine, which represents the passing of experience and knowledge from older generations to the newest generation of Marines. The birthday cake is traditionally cut with the Mameluke sword, to honor Lieutenant Presley O’Bannon’s assault of Derna, Tripoli in 1805, as a reminder that Marines are a band of warriors, committed to carrying the sword, so that the nation may live in peace.

Marines with 3rd Assault Amphibian Battalion from 1st Marine Division participated in Marine Forces Special Operations Command's unit readiness exercise, RAVEN. The training conducted provides exposure to small unit tactics they might not otherwise receive, particularly units like 3rd AABN, whose day-to-day responsibilities are focused on amphibious assault vehicle readiness, basic formations and water ops, and terrain driving. The exercise serves as the certification exercise for a soon-to-be deploying Marine Special Operations Company. It has evolved into a multilevel venue to integrate the various command structures and capabilities deployed by MARSOC. Each level of command, down to the team, is challenged in planning and executing, and command and controlling activities in urban environments. It is also an opportunity to enhance collaboration and strengthen our operational relationships between members of the SOF community, conventional Marine Corps units and other partners with whom Marine Raiders work closely, ensuring MARSOC provides the nation with an agile, adaptive force to meet the complex demands of the future operating environment. - Marines with 3rd Assault Amphibian Battalion from 1st Marine Division participated in Marine Forces Special Operations Command's unit readiness exercise, RAVEN. The training conducted provides exposure to small unit tactics they might not otherwise receive, particularly units like 3rd AABN, whose day-to-day responsibilities are focused on amphibious assault vehicle readiness, basic formations and water ops, and terrain driving. The exercise serves as the certification exercise for a soon-to-be deploying Marine Special Operations Company. It has evolved into a multilevel venue to integrate the various command structures and capabilities deployed by MARSOC. Each level of command, down to the team, is challenged in planning and executing, and command and controlling activities in urban environments. It is also an opportunity to enhance collaboration and strengthen our operational relationships between members of the SOF community, conventional Marine Corps units and other partners with whom Marine Raiders work closely, ensuring MARSOC provides the nation with an agile, adaptive force to meet the complex demands of the future operating environment.

Four EA-6B Prowlers belonging to each Prowler squadron aboard Marine Corps Air Station Cherry Point conducted a "Final Four" division flight aboard the air station March 1, 2016. The "Final Four" flight is the last time the Prowler squadrons will be flying together before the official retirement of Marine Tactical Electronic Warfare Training Squadron 1 at the end of Fiscal Year 16 and the eventual transition to "MAGTF EW". MAGTF EW is a more distributed strategy where every platform contributes to the EW mission, enabling relevant tactical information to move throughout the electromagnetic spectrum and across the battlefield faster than ever before. - Four EA-6B Prowlers belonging to each Prowler squadron aboard Marine Corps Air Station Cherry Point conducted a "Final Four" division flight aboard the air station March 1, 2016. The "Final Four" flight is the last time the Prowler squadrons will be flying together before the official retirement of Marine Tactical Electronic Warfare Training Squadron 1 at the end of Fiscal Year 16 and the eventual transition to "MAGTF EW". MAGTF EW is a more distributed strategy where every platform contributes to the EW mission, enabling relevant tactical information to move throughout the electromagnetic spectrum and across the battlefield faster than ever before.

Lance Cpl. Quentin J. Stallings, left, and Lance Cpl. Kyle H. Clemens, right, configure the settings on a water pump and filter at Marine Corps Auxiliary Landing Field Bogue, N.C., Dec. 9, 2015. Marines with Marine Wing Support Squadron 271’s Engineer Company participated in a cantonment and capabilities field exercise to practice and improve their knowledge of their jobs while in a deployed environment. The week-long exercise featured events such as airfield damage repair, water purification, medium and heavy lifting missions, with the construction of an expedient road for a vertical take-off and landing aircraft pad. Stallings and Clemens are both water support technicians with MWSS-271. - Lance Cpl. Quentin J. Stallings, left, and Lance Cpl. Kyle H. Clemens, right, configure the settings on a water pump and filter at Marine Corps Auxiliary Landing Field Bogue, N.C., Dec. 9, 2015. Marines with Marine Wing Support Squadron 271’s Engineer Company participated in a cantonment and capabilities field exercise to practice and improve their knowledge of their jobs while in a deployed environment. The week-long exercise featured events such as airfield damage repair, water purification, medium and heavy lifting missions, with the construction of an expedient road for a vertical take-off and landing aircraft pad. Stallings and Clemens are both water support technicians with MWSS-271.

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