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U.S. Marines with Battalion Landing Team 1/5, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, and soldiers with Amphibious Rapid Deployment Brigade, conduct integrated coordination of an air assault training exercise, on Combined Arms Training Center Camp Fuji, Japan, March 9, 2022. The training exercise was conducted to build proficiency in rapidly seizing and defending key terrain. Maritime Defense Exercise Amphibious Rapid Deployment Brigade is a bilateral exercise meant to increase interoperability and strengthen ties between U.S. and Japanese forces for the defense of Japan. - U.S. Marines with Battalion Landing Team 1/5, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, and soldiers with Amphibious Rapid Deployment Brigade, conduct integrated coordination of an air assault training exercise, on Combined Arms Training Center Camp Fuji, Japan, March 9, 2022. The training exercise was conducted to build proficiency in rapidly seizing and defending key terrain. Maritime Defense Exercise Amphibious Rapid Deployment Brigade is a bilateral exercise meant to increase interoperability and strengthen ties between U.S. and Japanese forces for the defense of Japan.

U.S. Marine Corps Lance Cpl. Jared Curtis, and Lance Cpl. Dylan Shawver, guard force sentries with 2d Marine Expeditionary Support Battalion, II Marine Expeditionary Force, pose with a portable handset enabled with PacStar Radio over Internet Protocol during Exercise Cold Response 2022, Bodo, Norway, March 9, 2022. PacStar RoIP is a critical communication capability which enables instantaneous and simultaneous two-way radio communication using local and worldwide internet networks. Exercise Cold Response '22 is a biennial Norwegian national readiness and defense exercise that takes place across Norway, with participation from each of its military services, as well as from 26 additional North Atlantic Treaty Organization allied nations and regional partners. - U.S. Marine Corps Lance Cpl. Jared Curtis, and Lance Cpl. Dylan Shawver, guard force sentries with 2d Marine Expeditionary Support Battalion, II Marine Expeditionary Force, pose with a portable handset enabled with PacStar Radio over Internet Protocol during Exercise Cold Response 2022, Bodo, Norway, March 9, 2022. PacStar RoIP is a critical communication capability which enables instantaneous and simultaneous two-way radio communication using local and worldwide internet networks. Exercise Cold Response '22 is a biennial Norwegian national readiness and defense exercise that takes place across Norway, with participation from each of its military services, as well as from 26 additional North Atlantic Treaty Organization allied nations and regional partners.

U.S. Marine Staff Sgt. Joshua Wilson, front, a joint terminal attack controller instructor with 5th Air Naval Gunfire Liaison Company, III Marine Expeditionary Force Information Group, and U.S. Army Special Forces operators with 1st Special Forces Group, conduct simulated close air support using handheld Link 16 radios at Marine Corps Air Station Iwakuni, Japan, Feb. 15, 2022. The training focused on the joint force’s ability to integrate and refine tactics of CAS, which requires detailed planning and careful coordination between pilots and forces on the ground. - U.S. Marine Staff Sgt. Joshua Wilson, front, a joint terminal attack controller instructor with 5th Air Naval Gunfire Liaison Company, III Marine Expeditionary Force Information Group, and U.S. Army Special Forces operators with 1st Special Forces Group, conduct simulated close air support using handheld Link 16 radios at Marine Corps Air Station Iwakuni, Japan, Feb. 15, 2022. The training focused on the joint force’s ability to integrate and refine tactics of CAS, which requires detailed planning and careful coordination between pilots and forces on the ground.

U.S. Marine Corps Lt. Collin Bish, landing support and air delivery officer in charge, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit (MEU) and Lance Cpl. Angel D. Marmolejo, a transmission system operator with Combat Logistics Battalion 31, 31st MEU, establish a communications network while participating in mass casualty response training on Ie Shima, Feb. 10, 2022. - U.S. Marine Corps Lt. Collin Bish, landing support and air delivery officer in charge, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit (MEU) and Lance Cpl. Angel D. Marmolejo, a transmission system operator with Combat Logistics Battalion 31, 31st MEU, establish a communications network while participating in mass casualty response training on Ie Shima, Feb. 10, 2022. The mass casualty response mission allows the 31st MEU to reach victims of an attack, natural disaster or other emergent events when local medical and reactionary forces are unable to provide proper medical care. The 31st MEU is operating aboard ships of the Expeditionary Strike Group in the 7th fleet area of operations to enhance interoperability with allies and partners, and serve as a ready response force to defend peace and stability in the Indo-Pacific region. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Manuel Alvarado)

U.S. Marine Corps Sgt. Maj. John E. Bejarano, left, sergeant major, and Lt. Col. James R. Arnold, right, commanding officer, both with 3d Littoral Anti-Air Battalion, 3d Marines, 3d Marine Division, uncase the colors of 3d LAAB during an activation ceremony on Marine Corps Base Hawaii, Feb. 11, 2022. 3d LAAB is designed to train and employ air defense, air surveillance, early warning, air control, and forward rearming and refueling capabilities. The battalion activated in accordance with Force Design 2030 as 3d Marines prepares to become the U.S. Marine Corps’ inaugural Marine Littoral Regiment. - U.S. Marine Corps Sgt. Maj. John E. Bejarano, left, sergeant major, and Lt. Col. James R. Arnold, right, commanding officer, both with 3d Littoral Anti-Air Battalion, 3d Marines, 3d Marine Division, uncase the colors of 3d LAAB during an activation ceremony on Marine Corps Base Hawaii, Feb. 11, 2022. 3d LAAB is designed to train and employ air defense, air surveillance, early warning, air control, and forward rearming and refueling capabilities. The battalion activated in accordance with Force Design 2030 as 3d Marines prepares to become the U.S. Marine Corps’ inaugural Marine Littoral Regiment.

Ships of the America and Essex Amphibious Ready Groups, and Carrier Strike Group 3, sail in formation with the Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force during exercise Noble Fusion. Left to right: USS Dewey (DDG 105), USS Ashland (LSD 48), JS Kongō (DDG 173), USS Miguel Keith (ESB 5), USS America (LHA 6), USS Mobile Bay (CG 53), USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72), USS Spruance (DDG 111), USS Essex (LHD 2), landing crafts, air cushion from Assault Craft Unit (ACU) 5. Noble Fusion demonstrates that Navy and Marine Corps forward-deployed stand-in naval expeditionary forces can rapidly aggregate Marine Expeditionary Unit/Amphibious Ready Group teams at sea, along with a carrier strike group, as well as other joint force elements and allies, in order to conduct lethal sea-denial operations, seize key maritime terrain, guarantee freedom of movement, and create advantage for U.S., partner and allied forces. Naval Expeditionary forces conduct training throughout the year, in the Indo-Pacific, to maintain readiness. - Ships of the America and Essex Amphibious Ready Groups, and Carrier Strike Group 3, sail in formation with the Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force during exercise Noble Fusion. Left to right: USS Dewey (DDG 105), USS Ashland (LSD 48), JS Kongō (DDG 173), USS Miguel Keith (ESB 5), USS America (LHA 6), USS Mobile Bay (CG 53), USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72), USS Spruance (DDG 111), USS Essex (LHD 2), landing crafts, air cushion from Assault Craft Unit (ACU) 5. Noble Fusion demonstrates that Navy and Marine Corps forward-deployed stand-in naval expeditionary forces can rapidly aggregate Marine Expeditionary Unit/Amphibious Ready Group teams at sea, along with a carrier strike group, as well as other joint force elements and allies, in order to conduct lethal sea-denial operations, seize key maritime terrain, guarantee freedom of movement, and create advantage for U.S., partner and allied forces. Naval Expeditionary forces conduct training throughout the year, in the Indo-Pacific, to maintain readiness.

An F-35B Lightning II from the Marine Fighter Attack Squadron 121 gets refueled by a KC-135 Stratotanker from the 909th Air Refueling Squadron in support of Exercise Noble Fusion over the Pacific Ocean Feb. 4, 2022. Noble Fusion demonstrates that Navy and Marine Corps forward-deployed stand-in naval expeditionary forces can rapidly aggregate Marine Expeditionary Unit/Amphibious Ready Group teams at sea, along with a carrier strike group, joint forces and allies in order to conduct lethal sea-denial operations, seize key maritime terrain, guarantee freedom of movement, and create advantage for U.S., partner and allied forces. Naval Expeditionary forces conduct training in the Indo-Pacific throughout the year to maintain readiness. - An F-35B Lightning II from the Marine Fighter Attack Squadron 121 gets refueled by a KC-135 Stratotanker from the 909th Air Refueling Squadron in support of Exercise Noble Fusion over the Pacific Ocean Feb. 4, 2022. Noble Fusion demonstrates that Navy and Marine Corps forward-deployed stand-in naval expeditionary forces can rapidly aggregate Marine Expeditionary Unit/Amphibious Ready Group teams at sea, along with a carrier strike group, joint forces and allies in order to conduct lethal sea-denial operations, seize key maritime terrain, guarantee freedom of movement, and create advantage for U.S., partner and allied forces. Naval Expeditionary forces conduct training in the Indo-Pacific throughout the year to maintain readiness.

U.S. Marine Corps Lt. Gen. James W. Bierman, the III Marine Expeditionary Force Commanding General, and Japan Self-Defense Force LTG Ryoji Takemoto, the Western Army Commanding General, collaboratively lead a virtual bilateral operations confirmation brief during exercise Keen Edge 22, Feb. 2, 2022. Keen Edge 22 was a bilateral command post exercise conducted Jan. 27 through Feb. 3, 2022. The exercise is an annual event that improves interagency coordination, combat readiness and interoperability of all participants. This U.S.-Japan exercise series alternates between field training exercises (i.e., Keen Sword) and command post exercises (i.e., Keen Edge). - U.S. Marine Corps Lt. Gen. James W. Bierman, the III Marine Expeditionary Force Commanding General, and Japan Self-Defense Force LTG Ryoji Takemoto, the Western Army Commanding General, collaboratively lead a virtual bilateral operations confirmation brief during exercise Keen Edge 22, Feb. 2, 2022. Keen Edge 22 was a bilateral command post exercise conducted Jan. 27 through Feb. 3, 2022. The exercise is an annual event that improves interagency coordination, combat readiness and interoperability of all participants. This U.S.-Japan exercise series alternates between field training exercises (i.e., Keen Sword) and command post exercises (i.e., Keen Edge).

Marines TV: Patrol Supervisor Sgt. Andrew Zarnowski